pbs Digest, Vol 148, Issue 14

Ben Zonneveld ben.zonneveld@naturalis.nl
Thu, 21 May 2015 00:22:26 PDT
As usual the terms sport and mutation are mixed
A mutation is a change in DNA and can be inherited
A sport is a shoot that is different from the motherplant. A seedling is
never a sport.
Sport is not an official term. However it covers changes without knowing
what actually has happened.
Possibilities:
A. mutation ( a change in DNA), B. somatic recombination ( exchange of
chromosome parts, in heterozygous plants)) C. chimaeral rearrangement . The
latter is a shift in the three layers like a green or yellow branch in a
variegated leafed plant
Ben Zonneveld

2015-05-21 7:43 GMT+02:00 <pbs-request@lists.ibiblio.org>:

> Send pbs mailing list submissions to
>         pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>         http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>         pbs-request@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
>         pbs-owner@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of pbs digest..."
>
>
> List-Post:&lt;mailto:pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> List-Archive:&lt;http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Soils and flower color (Rodger Whitlock)
>    2. Re: Definition? (Barbara McMullen)
>    3. Flora of Oregon Vol. 1 preorder (Travis O)
>    4. Re: Definition? (Boyce Tankersley)
>    5. Re: Definition? (Tim Eck)
>    6. Re: Definition? (Barbara McMullen)
>    7. Re: Definition? (Barbara McMullen)
>    8. Re: Bulbs in clay, was Soils and flower color (penstemon)
>    9. Attention Moraea lovers (Robert Werra)
>   10. layering in bulbs with other plants (Kathleen Sayce)
>   11. Re: Attention Moraea lovers (Don Leevers)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 14:21:45 -0700
> From: "Rodger Whitlock" <totototo@telus.net>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Soils and flower color
> Message-ID: <5559F579.31980.4170@localhost>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
> On 17 May 2015, at 19:11, Peter Taggart wrote:
>
> > That period of semi-dryness [which serves to maintain plants in drought
> > mode] so important for bulbs lasts longer in small particle soils than in
> > granular, when soils are drying out and bulbs are 'dormant'
>
> Cyclamen, for example, imbibe moisture via the roots even in dormancy. Try
> lifting a cyclamen tuber in summer and leaving it on a shelf. It will soon
> get
> flabby.
>
> Tulips pose another interesting example of how people misinterpret words.
> It's
> commonly said that tulips need to be dry in summer, and a fair number of
> people
> misinterpret this as meaning a sandy soil. Nothing could be further from
> the
> truth; tulips do best in a rather heavy clay-ish soil that goes dry in the
> summer. Put them in a lean, sandy soil and they won't thrive like they do
> in a
> heavier soil.
>
>
> --
> Rodger Whitlock
> Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
> Z. 7-8, cool Mediterranean climate
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 18:35:12 -0400
> From: Barbara McMullen <enna1921@live.ca>
> To: "Pacific Bulb Society" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> Message-ID: <BLU184-DS272FE489806E5FE2F492A6CFC40@phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="utf-8";
>         reply-type=original
>
> Thanks
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bulborum Botanicum
> Sent: Monday, May 18, 2015 3:57 AM
> To: Pacific Bulb Society
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
>
> It's a mutation in the colour of a hybrid Tulip
>
> Roland
>
> R de Boer
> 2238 Route de la Maugardiere
> F 27260 EPAIGNES
> FRANCE
>
> Phone./Fax 0033-232-576-204
> Email:   bulborum@gmail.com
> Facebook Group English :https://www.facebook.com/groups/bulborum/
> <https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511/>
> Facebook Group French : https://www.facebook.com/groups/1454572311501070/
>
> 2015-05-17 0:56 GMT+02:00 Barbara McMullen <bmcmullen@cogeco.ca>:
>
> > What?s a sport of a tulip?  Dictionaries are not helpful.
> >
> > Also, how did fringed tulips get hybridized?
> >
> > Barbara McMullen, Ontario
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 21:26:33 -0700
> From: Travis O <enoster@hotmail.com>
> To: "pbs@lists.ibiblio.org" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: [pbs] Flora of Oregon Vol. 1 preorder
> Message-ID: <COL403-EAS3227458180268BBC6FB25ECBBC30@phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252"
>
> Hi,
>
> The 'Flora of Oregon' is getting ready to be published and can now be
> preordered from the website below [1]. Volume 1 includes all monocots as
> well as pteridophytes and gymnosperms. Volumes 2 and 3 will be the dicots.
> The book looks and sounds amazing!
>
> Here is a description of the book from the website [1] below:
>
> "The Oregon Flora Project, Oregon State University, and Botanical Research
> Institute of Texas Press have collaborated to publish the Flora of Oregon,
> the first comprehensive flora of Oregon in over 50 years?with illustrations!
>
> The Flora of Oregon is a three-volume reference that will be the only
> state flora published in the past half century and the first illustrated
> floristic work that exclusively addresses Oregon. Volume 1 presents
> treatments of the pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and monocots?1,054 taxa, or
> 23% of all native and naturalized vascular plants of Oregon. The taxonomic
> treatments include dichotomous keys, family and generic synopses, full
> taxon descriptions, and illustrations. A dot map depicting vouchered
> occurrences and highlighted ecoregions that host the taxon accompanies each
> description. There are pen and ink illustrations of 521 taxa, including 86
> new works by artist John Myers.
>
> Color photographs accompany chapters describing the state?s ecology and
> sites for exploring botanical diversity. Also included are biographical
> sketches of notable Oregon botanists and appendices emphasizing plant taxa
> of interest to conservationists.
>
> A valuable reference for land managers, policy-makers, naturalists,
> wildflower enthusiasts, historians, teachers, and students of all ages, the
> Flora of Oregon is a welcome resource for all who appreciate the natural
> beauty and biodiversity of Oregon."
>
> [1] http://shop.brit.org/products/floraoforegon1/
>
> I want one.
>
> Travis Owen
> Rogue River, OR
>
> amateuranthecologist.blogspot.com
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 08:20:19 -0500
> From: Boyce Tankersley <btankers@gmail.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CADnnTuBredFVWfy6TkZhb+oN8SYb3XDxjTmfkUvU2yWtaw1f5Q@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Sports (mutations) also can result in double flowers or variegated foliage.
>
> Boyce Tankersley
> Chicago Botanic Garden
>
> On Sat, May 16, 2015 at 5:56 PM, Barbara McMullen <bmcmullen@cogeco.ca>
> wrote:
>
> > What?s a sport of a tulip?  Dictionaries are not helpful.
> >
> > Also, how did fringed tulips get hybridized?
> >
> > Barbara McMullen, Ontario
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 10:58:42 -0400
> From: "Tim Eck" <teck11@embarqmail.com>
> To: "'Pacific Bulb Society'" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> Message-ID: <002401d09244$4d973150$e8c593f0$@embarqmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="UTF-8"
>
> I believe it refers to ANY vegetative mutation.  (And some may include
> germ cell mutations also, but that is not my understanding)
>
> Tim Eck
> When a philosopher says something that is true, then it is trivial. When
> he says something that is not trivial, then it is false.
> Gauss
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: pbs [mailto:pbs-bounces@lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Boyce
> > Tankersley
> > Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 9:20 AM
> > To: Pacific Bulb Society
> > Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> >
> > Sports (mutations) also can result in double flowers or variegated
> foliage.
> >
> > Boyce Tankersley
> > Chicago Botanic Garden
> >
> > On Sat, May 16, 2015 at 5:56 PM, Barbara McMullen
> > <bmcmullen@cogeco.ca>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > What?s a sport of a tulip?  Dictionaries are not helpful.
> > >
> > > Also, how did fringed tulips get hybridized?
> > >
> > > Barbara McMullen, Ontario
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > pbs mailing list
> > > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 19:04:48 -0400
> From: Barbara McMullen <enna1921@live.ca>
> To: "Pacific Bulb Society" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> Message-ID: <BLU184-DS23B2D7619FE965C63CF86CCFC30@phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="UTF-8";
>         reply-type=original
>
> Thanks
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Boyce Tankersley
> Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 9:20 AM
> To: Pacific Bulb Society
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
>
> Sports (mutations) also can result in double flowers or variegated foliage.
>
> Boyce Tankersley
> Chicago Botanic Garden
>
> On Sat, May 16, 2015 at 5:56 PM, Barbara McMullen <bmcmullen@cogeco.ca>
> wrote:
>
> > What?s a sport of a tulip?  Dictionaries are not helpful.
> >
> > Also, how did fringed tulips get hybridized?
> >
> > Barbara McMullen, Ontario
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 19:05:25 -0400
> From: Barbara McMullen <enna1921@live.ca>
> To: "Pacific Bulb Society" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> Message-ID: <BLU184-DS23237C433DE7F72B28C487CFC30@phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="UTF-8";
>         reply-type=original
>
> Thanks
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tim Eck
> Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 10:58 AM
> To: 'Pacific Bulb Society'
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
>
> I believe it refers to ANY vegetative mutation.  (And some may include germ
> cell mutations also, but that is not my understanding)
>
> Tim Eck
> When a philosopher says something that is true, then it is trivial. When he
> says something that is not trivial, then it is false.
> Gauss
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: pbs [mailto:pbs-bounces@lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Boyce
> > Tankersley
> > Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 9:20 AM
> > To: Pacific Bulb Society
> > Subject: Re: [pbs] Definition?
> >
> > Sports (mutations) also can result in double flowers or variegated
> > foliage.
> >
> > Boyce Tankersley
> > Chicago Botanic Garden
> >
> > On Sat, May 16, 2015 at 5:56 PM, Barbara McMullen
> > <bmcmullen@cogeco.ca>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > What?s a sport of a tulip?  Dictionaries are not helpful.
> > >
> > > Also, how did fringed tulips get hybridized?
> > >
> > > Barbara McMullen, Ontario
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > pbs mailing list
> > > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 13:30:54 -0600
> From: "penstemon" <penstemon@Q.com>
> To: "Pacific Bulb Society" <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Bulbs in clay, was Soils and flower color
> Message-ID: <F3397C3B29604BC6A0B5446715FCB2D6@bobPC>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="UTF-8"
>
>
>
> >Nothing could be further from the
> truth; tulips do best in a rather heavy clay-ish soil that goes dry in the
> summer. Put them in a lean, sandy soil and they won't thrive like they do
> in a
> heavier soil.
>
> It?s probably the relative lack of air in heavy soils rather than any
> water-retentive properties (which only operate in mesic situations). In
> arid regions, clay is drier than sand.
> Most of the soil-water studies available online originate in regions with
> regular rainfall, so not really relevant here, or are directed toward crop
> irrigation, also not relevant.
>
> See Peterman, et al, Soil properties affect pinyon pine ? juniper response
> to drought, in Ecohydrology 2012
> (not only for the discussions of water in clay vs. coarse soils, but the
> fact that the definitely non-bulbous pinyon (Pinus edulis) is found on clay
> soils because of migration to such soils when precipitation rates were
> higher, 600 years ago).
>
> or Sala, et, al. Primary Production of the Central Grassland Region of the
> United States, Ecology, Vol. 69, no. 1 (1988)
>
> ?In dry regions, major losses of soil water occur via bare soil
> evaporation. However, where sandy soils occur, bare soil evaporation
> is lower than in loamy soils because water penetrates deeper into the
> soil. Runoff also is lower in sandy soils than in loamy soils.?
>
> or the online version of the Encyclopedia of Ecology, p.884.
>
> ?Soil texture is of large importance as it affects both infiltration and
> the movement of wetting fronts. Fine-textured soils that are high in clay
> and silt fraction tend to impeded infiltration, in which wetting fronts
> move only very slowly, and surface evaporation after rainfalls can be very
> high. More-coarse-textured soil rich in sand fractions, as for instance
> sandy loams, are characterized by high infiltration rates and rapid
> percolation. For this reason, coarse-textured soils are often better for
> plant growth. As this is in contrast to soils in mesic areas where
> fine-textured soils are commonly considered to be superior for plant
> production, this is called the ?inverse texture effect??.
>
>
> Bob Nold
> Denver, Colorado USA
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 15:19:12 -0700
> From: "Robert Werra" <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> To: <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Cc: "robert Werra" <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> Subject: [pbs] Attention Moraea lovers
> Message-ID: <146C807335CB446FA6BA502CA2DA3279@Game1>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Moraea lovers rejoice. Despite the drought, My few raised beds of moraeas
> in No. Calif. put on their best show in ten years. The sparse rains must
> have hit at the right time. I gave the bulk of my 25 year collection to
> Michael Mace in San Jose CA.to caretake for the future. The remainder have
> been a delight and there will be many seeds for moraea lovers. They began
> in Feb. with M.ciliata(white and various blues), M. macronyx(yellow and
> yellow-white), M.aristata, bellendini, calcicola, fergusonii, fugax,
> flicaulis, gawleri, gigandra, loubseri, luridaa, papillionacea, polyanthos,
> serpentina, stricta, tortillis, tricuspidata, tripetela, tulbaghensis,
> vegeta, villosa in assorted colors,and ending now with the wonderful  M.
> vespertina. It opens when yuo are at supper or vespers with large white
> slightly fragrant blossoms which fade by dark. Between my brush but mainly
> bees and bugs many are producing seed for BX and you. If you have special
> interest let me know.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 19:05:20 -0700
> From: Kathleen Sayce <ksayce@willapabay.org>
> To: pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> Subject: [pbs] layering in bulbs with other plants
> Message-ID: <F94EC021-1C74-4CE2-AE6B-7F9E572F0D42@willapabay.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> I?ve followed Ian Young?s bulb log for years, and have tried to devise a
> mix of ground covering plants to coexist with bulbs several times, based on
> his enthusiastic experiments in his own garden.
>
> What I have found is that any of several plants (Oxalis spp., Galium
> odoratum, Dicentra formosa, et cetera) are perfectly happy to cover the
> ground, but then slugs, snails and other plant eating invertebrates follow.
> These ground covering plants also do nothing to deter ivy, blackberry,
> spruce, or elderberry seedlings, let alone slow down muscular spreaders
> like creeping buttercup, or sheep sorrel.
>
> Just today I rescued four Lilium columbianum bulbs from a mat of Oxalis
> (which has lovely white flowers and nice green foliage) and quack grass,
> which had sneaked in under the Oxalis cover. Formerly there were 15 bulbs
> in this area, and some might still return next year. Or not.
>
> Admittedly, my garden, and the coastal Pacific Northwest in general, is
> over endowed with non-native slugs and snails.
>
> My question to the general readership is this:  Has anyone succeeded in
> North America with layers of green mixed plantings in which bulbs can
> thrive? Or does this provide too much cover for potential green pests and
> herbivorous invertebrates?
>
> Kathleen
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 07:43:03 +0200
> From: Don Leevers <venzano1@gmail.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Attention Moraea lovers
> Message-ID:
>         <CAMt1Vvg0D4jJ7aMX-NccxnnBDdv=
> 7fCqpnKVAKYePA5+u8RrLQ@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Dear robert,
> great news.I have a giant Moraea huttonii in flower .Its been at it for
> weeks.I look foreward to receiving some seed of your other ones at some
> time.
> Best regards,
> Donald Leevers (southern Italy)
>
> On Thu, May 21, 2015 at 12:19 AM, Robert Werra <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> wrote:
>
> > Moraea lovers rejoice. Despite the drought, My few raised beds of moraeas
> > in No. Calif. put on their best show in ten years. The sparse rains must
> > have hit at the right time. I gave the bulk of my 25 year collection to
> > Michael Mace in San Jose CA.to caretake for the future. The remainder
> have
> > been a delight and there will be many seeds for moraea lovers. They began
> > in Feb. with M.ciliata(white and various blues), M. macronyx(yellow and
> > yellow-white), M.aristata, bellendini, calcicola, fergusonii, fugax,
> > flicaulis, gawleri, gigandra, loubseri, luridaa, papillionacea,
> polyanthos,
> > serpentina, stricta, tortillis, tricuspidata, tripetela, tulbaghensis,
> > vegeta, villosa in assorted colors,and ending now with the wonderful  M.
> > vespertina. It opens when yuo are at supper or vespers with large white
> > slightly fragrant blossoms which fade by dark. Between my brush but
> mainly
> > bees and bugs many are producing seed for BX and you. If you have special
> > interest let me know.
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Subject: Digest Footer
>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of pbs Digest, Vol 148, Issue 14
> ************************************
>



-- 

BJM Zonneveld
 Naturalis, Herbarium section
Postbox 9517
 Darwinweg 2,  2300RA Leiden
The Netherlands
Email: ben.zonneveld@naturalis.nl <Ben.Zonneveld@naturalis.nl>,
telf 071-7517228





More information about the pbs mailing list